Cytomegalovirus infection in steroid-refractory ulcerative colitis a case-control study

Postperfusion syndrome develops two to four weeks after transfusion with fresh blood containing CMV and is characterized by fever lasting two to three weeks, hepatitis of variable degrees with or without jaundice, a characteristic atypical lymphocytosis (excess of lymph cells in the blood or in any effusion) resembling that of infectious mononucleosis, and occasionally a rash. CMV infection in patients with malignancy or receiving immunosuppressive therapy may cause pulmonary, gastrointestinal or renal (kidney) involvement. This complication is of major importance in some reported transplantation series in which immunosuppressive therapy is utilized.

See also
AIDS and HIV Infection
Congenital Infections
Herpes Simplex Virus Infections
Immune Deficiencies
Laboratory Tests
Mononucleosis, Infectious
Pneumonia

Cytomegalovirus infection in steroid-refractory ulcerative colitis a case-control study

cytomegalovirus infection in steroid-refractory ulcerative colitis a case-control study

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cytomegalovirus infection in steroid-refractory ulcerative colitis a case-control studycytomegalovirus infection in steroid-refractory ulcerative colitis a case-control studycytomegalovirus infection in steroid-refractory ulcerative colitis a case-control studycytomegalovirus infection in steroid-refractory ulcerative colitis a case-control studycytomegalovirus infection in steroid-refractory ulcerative colitis a case-control study