Steroid induced myopathy muscle biopsy

Acute gout attacks can be managed with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), colchicine, or corticosteroids (intra-articular injection or systemic). All three agents are appropriate first-line therapy for acute gout. Therapy should be initiated within 24 hours of onset. The drug selection is dictated by the patient's tolerance of those medications and the presence of any comorbid diseases that contraindicates the use of a specific drug. For patients with severe or refractory gout attacks, practitioners can try combining agents. If all of these medications are contraindicated in a patient, narcotics may be used short term to relieve pain until the acute attack has resolved. Long-term use of narcotics should be avoided.

For patients who present with rhabdomyolysis, treatment is aimed at preventing kidney failure in the acute setting. Vigorous hydration with close monitoring of kidney function and electrolytes are paramount. In patients with an underlying metabolic myopathy, education about following a more moderate exercise program and avoiding intense exercise and fasting is necessary in preventing recurrent episodes. Measures that have been suggested to be helpful include sucrose loading before exercise in some glycogen storage disorders and a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet in patients with lipid storage disorders.

Steroid induced myopathy muscle biopsy

steroid induced myopathy muscle biopsy

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